Writer’s Linkstravaganza

On Tuesday, Brandon dropped a link in a comment that I spent some time perusing.

That lead me to a whole cornucopia of great links for writers, which I shall now share with you.

The first link is from an online ‘zine called Clarkesworld, with an interview of ten fantasy, science fiction, and speculative fiction magazine editors about what they are looking for in submissions to their magazines.  One of the ten may (or may not be) the market to which I intend to submit my story first (once it’s done).  What I found particularly enlightening was the answer for why a good story might actually be rejected by the magazine.  Words I need to keep in mind as I begin to submit my stories.  Here is the interview on Clarkesworld:

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/editors_interview/

Related to that wonderful bit is this piece, on a blog called “Editorial Anonymous” in which an anonymous children’s book editor discusses what a rejection letter really means.  The short answer: not a whole lot, except that that market won’t be purchasing your story – and that it’s certainly no reflection on the quality of your work.

http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2007/04/rules-of-receiving-rejection-letter.html

Next is a pair of links that are relevant to newbie professional writers, and writers-to-be (like myself) posted on a blog called “Side-show Freaks”.  The first of these is a handy primer on the lingo in the publishing world.  The second a minor rant on the basics that we, as writers, ought to be doing in our submissions.  These, both, from the editor of the magazine “Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show“.

The lingo primer:

http://sideshowfreaks.blogspot.com/2008/10/basic-definitions-for-writers.html

And submission basics:

http://sideshowfreaks.blogspot.com/2008/10/submissions-basics.html

Today’s final link offer some of the thoughts of a literary author named George Saunders on various topics.  Particularly interesting are his comments on a character’s Interior Monologue and on the writing Voice.  Practicing the techniques suggested in these two sections could go a long way to improving your writing – or at least I know it will help mine.

http://lit.konundrum.com/features/saunders_wisdom1.htm

That’s it for today.  If you run across a great writerly link, feel free to share it with me!  I won’t bite!